by agatha | 20:16

Are you a woman wanting to get into rugby? We take a look at everything you need to know about the women’s game and why it’s a terrific choice of team sport. From the basic facts to how you can get started, read on for your essential guide to women’s rugby.

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Women’s rugby: the facts

The England Women’s Rugby Team is hugely successful. In 2014, they won the Rugby World Cup in France, after beating Canada 21-9. In 2012, they won their 7th consecutive win in the Six Nations Cup, also becoming the first ever women’s team in Six Nations history not to concede a try. Prior to these seven wins, they had won 6 out of the 10 Women’s Six Nation Cups since it began, and they also won this year with a Grand Slam. Today, 18,000 women and girls in England play rugby. Women’s Rugby in England is governed by the Rugby Football Union. Not only is rugby a terrific team sport and a great opportunity to make friends, socialise and form lifelong bonds, it’s also a really good way to stay fit, healthy and active.

Where to start

For girls aged under 11, the option is to play in Mixed Mini Rugby, so contact your local rugby club to see if they have a mini team. From age 11 onwards (U12s), girls can join competitive women’s rugby teams. Again, check with your local club to see if they have a team, or if they have combined with other areas to form cluster clubs which put together teams when there are not enough players. Young talented players are identified from aged 14, and are invited to join the Talent Development Group and may go on to play for the England U20s.

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Those aged over 18 can try out for one of the 250 senior women’s and women’s university rugby teams in England. If you want to play but not competitively, clubs may allow you to join in their training sessions. At a training session, you can expect to do a number of training exercises, like the rugby drill video exercises found at https://www.sportplan.net/drills/Rugby/, with sessions typically ending in a friendly match.

With a high achieving national team as role models, it’s little wonder more and more women and girls are looking to the sport.

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